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‘What’s for dinner?’ It’s a question that causes #RBG and this writer to reflect on the related stereotypes.

It was a sold-out theater for Connecticut NOW’s advance screening of “On the Basis of Sex” last night.

By CAROLYN MILAZZO MURPHY

The “kids” are still home from college, so a few of our son’s friends and their families gathered the other night to catch up.

It was a low-key affair on a weeknight to accommodate everyone’s schedule. Our host’s Christmas tree and decorations were still up and a fire burned in the family room fireplace, lending a cozy feel to the evening. A cat perched on a sofa arm, and wine was consumed before and during dinner. So much for the January Experiment, a new book advocating abstaining from alcohol during the month of January.

So nothing that extraordinary except one thing: the main course was prepared entirely by my son’s friend, a college senior. Let me clarify that. When the dinner was slated for a Monday night and his mom had to work all day, he also shopped and prepped the meal too.

I have college-age nieces who love to cook and food shop, or “source” as they say, and have been turning out incredible meals for years. But the boys? Not so much. And though I’ve over-parented my son in many areas, I’ve failed miserably in the cooking department.

He expects me to cook every night. This may not sound like a big deal, but it is. Breaking down gender-specific roles like cooking and care-taking was at the core of the early women’s rights movement. The new movie “On the Basis of Sex”  spotlights the issue, telling the story of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s fight to change a tax law that prohibited a man from taking a caretaker’s tax credit.

The case ultimately resulted in overturning 178 laws that discriminated on the basis of sex and were declared unconstitutional.

While prepping the landmark case with her husband Marty, Ginsburg notes that the tax law is antiquated and discriminatory because it assumes only women are caretakers and eligible for the deduction.

“Our client is a man. We can’t lose sight of that. Men are also harmed by these stereotypes,” Marty tells Ruth. “Boys are told they’re not supposed to be nurses, or teachers . . . ”

“Or cook for their families,” Ruth says.

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                          A rare sight: my son grinding spices for the Thanksgiving turkey.

I’m not sure what RBG would think of my parenting skills when it comes to raising a modern man, but I suspect she wouldn’t be pleased. She divided household and parenting chores with Marty in the mid-50s when most women stayed home and raised families while their husbands went off to work. She’d probably be shocked that in 2019, some boys (and men) still expect and assume women will do all the cooking.

I know I could have done a better job, and I hope it’s not too late. In about 18 months, my son will graduate from college and will probably (hopefully) be living on his own. He needs to know how to cook. Everyone needs to know this important life skill.

I bounced this off some women I know with older children. They said I should chill out, noting cooking is something kids tend to gravitate to like any other hobby. Some also said they enjoy being the sole cook in their household, noting they enjoy having control of meal planning and what they eat.

They have a point, I suppose, but it’s nice to have a meal prepared for you once in awhile, and not have the burden of cooking every day. It’s nice when other people pick up the slack, freeing you up to do other things in the early evening.

I started out with the best of intentions. When my son was little, he sat on a kitchen stool or counter and “helped” me. One of our favorite annual traditions was making homemade sugar cookies, cutting them into different shapes for Christmas. After they cooled, we covered them in colorful frosting and doused them in various shades of sprinkles.

But our kitchen time diminished as he grew up and became interested in sports and video games (I know. X-Box was another huge mistake). He wasn’t interested in cooking, so we didn’t do it. I forgot that like a lot of things in life, such as cleaning and laundry, it’s important for parents to lead the way and demand participation.

A little background:

When we first got married, my husband cooked. He was 30, and had been living on his own for about seven years. He knew how to cook a limited menu – chili, tacos,  hotdogs, Shake & Bake chicken and spaghetti with sauce – and cooked a few times a week. We were both working full time, so it made sense and was fair to divide cooking chores.

Things changed when he went to law school, and began commuting an hour to and from campus. He had less time and inclination to cook and was swamped with studying, so I picked up the slack. Eventually, I began doing most of the cooking, which was OK because I was a better cook. In exchange, he did the dishes and cleaned the kitchen. It seemed like an even exchange because I hate cleaning the kitchen.

Cooking fell entirely on me when I decided to stay home with my kids about 20 years ago. Splitting household chores becomes impractical when one person is working at least 60 hours a week and carrying the full burden of the family’s finances. It wasn’t practical for him to cook when he was arriving home between 7 and 7:30 every night.

My evolution into chief cook was gradual, sort of like the weight that accumulates around your hips after age 50. Slowly and steadily, I took on the role of primary cook while he became the main breadwinner. I remained a freelance writer, but my “career” was not how I’d envisioned things back at my liberal arts women’s college.

I take comfort in the fact that some of my most liberal and full-time working friends are also the primary, um only, cooks in their house. Their husbands wait until they walk in the door late at night and ask, “What’s for dinner?” too. But I hoped I’d do better with my son, raising a guy who knows his way around the kitchen.

I didn’t realize my oversight until my friend’s son cooked steak and roasted butternut squash and Brussels sprouts, even asking everyone how we’d like our steak cooked. When I suggested that my son make a similar meal for us, he waved me off.

“He just threw a couple of steaks on the grill,” he said. “What’s the big deal?”

You could say I spoiled my kids, but that doesn’t fully explain it. Our 17-year-old daughter cooks and bakes, and has been doing so for years. Some of it is necessity: she’s the most finicky eater I’ve ever met, and often doesn’t want to eat what I’m making. But sometimes she thrills me and makes enough zucchini noodles and sauce for all of us, and it’s such a relief to have a night off.

Our son has no interest in cooking, unless ramen noodles, canned soup and microwave popcorn count. He’s never been terribly interested in food, even as a baby. I used to call my mom in tears when I’d make and throw out 21 meals every week during his first two years of life. I’m not entirely sure how he’s gotten to be the size he is, but I guess he got some nutrients along the way.

It’s only with hindsight that I realize I dropped the ball. If I could do things over, I’d spend less time at my son’s tennis matches, and more time with him in the kitchen. I’d teach him knife skills, how to marinate meat, how to make a hearty soup and how to bake a potato so it doesn’t come out like a rock. I’d teach him how to pick out eggplants (always pick the lightest ones for the fewest seeds), how to grill fish and how to bake and frost cupcakes.

Fortunately, it’s not too late. He’s only a college junior, so I still have time to show him the ropes. And somehow, I think RBG would approve.

Carolyn Milazzo Murphy is a regular contributor to the Connecticut NOW blog.

 

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Despite Dem majority, we need to stay vigilant about reproductive rights

By Lauren Pizzoferrato

As a result of November’s election, Connecticut’s 2019 Legislative Session opens today with a majority of Democrats in both the state House and Senate who support reproductive rights.

Despite this, legislative action on the federal level has the potential to limit reproductive choice in Connecticut. This month, the Trump administration is expected to release another domestic gag rule that could cause Title X providers like Connecticut’s Planned Parenthood of Southern New England to lose millions of federal dollars because they provide abortion. If these dollars become available, the expectation is that misleading crisis pregnancy centers like those that exist in Hartford, New Haven, Meriden, Bridgeport and throughout Connecticut will begin to vie for them.

Also of huge concern is the Trump administration proposal for separate insurance for abortion coverage—something that Access Health CT, Connecticut’s Affordable Care Act exchange, has protested.

Here in Connecticut on the state level, bills that would limit a woman’s access to reproductive choice–taking away a women’s ability to control of her own health and body—have also already been introduced into the General Assembly.

All of us who believe in reproductive health and freedom must remain aware and vigilant to protect our state from attacks within Connecticut, and from the federal government. Both in the U.S. Congress and Connecticut General Assembly, we have a majority of legislators who support reproductive rights and will fight for progressive legislation. We need to continuously reach out to them, urging them to stand firm when it comes to women’s health and reproductive freedom, and thanking them when they speak out on our behalf.

Connecticut NOW will keep you informed on when proposed bills that the CT Coalition for Choice is following need your voice, and for you to reach out to your legislators.

Lauren Pizzoferrato serves as Connecticut NOW’s liaison to the CT Coalition for Choice.

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Sneak Peek: On the Basis of Sex


UPDATE at 1:40 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 10: We are sold out!

By CAROLYN MILAZZO MURPHY

I apparently have a lot of friends who want to go to the movies with me.

After I posted “Alone Time” https://thegsandwich.wordpress.com/ about my first foray to the movies by myself to see A Star Is Born, some friends lamented that I didn’t invite them to join me.

“The next time you’re going to the movies, call me. I love to go to movies and I’ll go with you,” a friend told me last night. Other friends indicated disappointment that I didn’t call them before heading out on my own.

So just in case anyone’s interested, I’m going to see a sneak preview of On the Basis of Sex Thursday evening at the Cinemark North Haven. The Connecticut chapter of the National Organization of Women bought out a 50-seat theater, and some tickets are still available. The $22 cost covers your ticket and a small donation to NOW. The film starts at 6:45 p.m.

If you want to come, please join us. There are still seats, but they’re going fast.

The film portrays a period in Ginsburg’s life where she juggled Harvard Law School with parenting her 3-year-old daughter and caring for her cancer-stricken husband. It stars Felicity Jones as Ginsburg and Armie Hammer as her loving husband Marty, who was also in Harvard Law at the time.

I saw a preview before The Mule, and it looks as intriguing as you’d expect. RBG is a trailblazer and a woman before her time, staking out a career in the 1950s in the male dominated field of law. She became the second woman appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court when named by President Clinton in 1993.

I’m eager to see this movie, particularly with a group of women who are advocates for women’s rights. Ginsburg paved the way for all of us, and remains an inspiration today at age 85.

Carolyn Milazzo Murphy is a freelance writer and contributor to the Connecticut chapter of NOW’s blog.

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Wraps Comfort Domestic Violence Victims

Just a few days after the launch of the With-You Wrap, this beautiful wrap arrived at Connecticut NOW chapter president Cindy Wolfe Boynton’s home.

By CAROLYN MILAZZO MURPHY

I’m the world’s worst knitter, and don’t even get me started on crocheting.

I admire women who knit at their kids’ basketball games or boring municipal meetings, expertly looping yarn over their knitting needles, but it’s Greek to me. My crafty mom tried to teach me to knit when I was about 13 and I just couldn’t get it. This was hard to accept for someone who prides herself on having excellent hand-eye coordination.

Knitting and crocheting are skills to be treasured and shared. Besides being able to make afghans, sweaters, scarves and mittens to provide warmth, handmade creations reflect a personal touch and creative spirit missing in today’s world of mass produced everything.

An article in Handmade Business summed it up this way:

“When you make something, you leave a part of yourself in it. When you are finished creating, you take pride in the work partly because you see yourself in it. When you buy something someone else made, you yourself are reflected in that purchase. Whether it’s the color, the texture, the shape, or just the mood you happen to be in, an item that has been crafted as an expression of the creative spirit person who made it is treasured and valued far beyond an item that was made for worldly mass consumption.”

The Connecticut chapter of NOW is calling on all knitters and crocheters, hoping their creations can infuse comfort, support and hope into the growing number of women and kids who are victims of domestic violence. The chapter has launched the “With-You Wrap,” a project to provide shawls to domestic violence victims so they never feel alone.

Just four days after the official Jan. 1st launch, the first wrap arrived on chapter president Cindy Boynton’s doorstep. Organizers hope to provide wraps to about 1,200 domestic violence victims in shelters across the state.

I love this project for a few reasons. It shows domestic violence victims, who often feel alone, afraid and abandoned, that someone is thinking about them. It also underscores the importance of the personal touch – one woman reaching out to another to provide comfort and hope for better days.

The number of women and children affected by domestic abuse in Connecticut is staggering. An estimated 38,000 victims of domestic violence turned to the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence (CCADV) and its 18 member organizations for counseling, shelter, court-based advocacy, and other essential services in 2018.

Boynton, who is an avid knitter, came up with the idea for the project. Inspired in part by prayer shawls worn by the sick, Cindy thought wraps would be a way of showing victims that someone cares. The project launched on Jan. 1, and already is gaining momentum from some knitting groups around the state.

Knitters and crocheters can be as creative as they wish, but are being asked to follow a few basic guidelines. The first is to create a rectangular shawl with some kind of purple yarn. The second is to include “3” into your design, whether it be that you use 3 different colors of yarn, cast on stitches that are a multiple of 3, or something different. (For a complete set of guidelines, click here http://now-ct.org/get-involved/knit-or-crochet-a-with-you-wrap/?fbclid=IwAR2Z7gM2aUXIs9gKOLf7qutlaVL9G-KTOfnGbnggIE1cOdHucUASgVG0UyM.

This project reminds me of a homemade cookie program I participated in during a vacation to Hilton Head Island, S.C., last spring. After listening to a representative of the Kairos Prison Project explain he needed about 30,000 homemade cookies for an upcoming weekend in South Carolina’s prisons, my family decided to do our part.

I liked the idea because in addition to making the cookies, you were asked to pray that your efforts would make a difference in the lives of inmates and everyone who came in contact with them, including their families and prison officials. Our three-dozen cookies didn’t look like much, but you never know the impact that one tiny gesture will have on another person.

I rode my bike with our cookies in my wire basket and dropped them off in the church vestibule. I admit I was a bit disheartened when I noticed some people had tossed Oreos and Chips Ahoy into the donation bin. That wasn’t exactly what the organizers had in mind.

I have no idea if the cookies helped a prisoner, but they helped us. We made them as a family with good intentions. Sometimes, the only thing that we can possibly do for other people is show them that we care, and that they’re not alone in this world. 

Carolyn Milazzo Murphy is a freelance writer and a blog contributor to the Connecticut chapter of NOW.

 

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Attend an advance, private screening of On the Basis of Sex

Advance tickets needed, and only a limited number available.

The Connecticut chapter of the National Organization for Women will host a special, private screening of the already-acclaimed “On the Basis of Sex” on Thursday, January 10 – the day before it opens nationwide!

Doors will open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7:15 p.m. show at the North Haven Cinemark, 550 Universal Drive, North Haven.

The film tells the inspiring and spirited true story of young lawyer Ruth Bader Ginsburg, as she teams with her husband Marty to bring a groundbreaking case before the U.S. Court of Appeals and overturn a century of gender discrimination. The film’s 2018 premiere coincides with Justice Ginsburg’s 25th anniversary on the Supreme Court. Ticket price of $22 includes a donation toward Connecticut NOW’s scholarship fund, which each summer pays the FULL TUITION for 1-2 Connecticut women to attend the Women’s Campaign School at Yale.

Tickets are limited and need to be purchased in advance!

Join us for the chance to see On the Basis of Sex before everyone else, PLUS the great feeling of knowing that your purchase will help increase the number and influence of Connecticut women in politics!

Any questions, please email president@now-ct.org.

Click here to make your secure payment and to reserve your seat.

 

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Show a domestic violence victim she’s not alone.

Connecticut NOW is excited to launch this new project for 2019!

Knit or crochet a With-You Wrap.

In 2018, more than 38,000 victims of domestic violence turned to the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence (CCADV) and its 18 member organizations for counseling, shelter, court-based advocacy, and other essential services.

Wrap your arms around one of these adult or child victims by knitting or crocheting a “With-You Wrap” infused with your love, strength and supportive energy.

Created and run by the Connecticut chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW), the With-You Wraps Project is designed to make sure that no Connecticut victim of domestic violence ever feels alone. … That each time she wears a With-You Wrap, she feels the comfort and support of the person who made it: a person who believes in the victim’s strength and worth, and who will stand with her always.

Become a With-You Wrap volunteer by creating and donating a shawl today. Here’s how:

Step 1:
Knit or crochet a rectangular shawl with some kind of purple yarn. You choose the exact dimensions, but we recommend roughly 24 x 60 for an adult shawl, and 15 x 45 for a youth shawl. Whatever size you choose, we ask you purposefully include “3” into your design, whether it be that you use 3 different colors of yarn, cast on stitches that are a multiple of 3, or something different.

Why knit or crochet with a “3”? Because symbolically, 3 represents something that is sold, real, substantial, complete. To the Mayan people, 3 was the scared number of women, and to the Japanese it represents the “3 treasures” of truth, courage and compassion—all things domestic violence victims deserve and need. Consciously adding these components to your wrap will add power and meaning.

Why use purple or a purply yarn? Purple is the official color of Domestic Violence Awareness. But it’s more than that, too. Purple combines the calm of blue and the fierceness of red. It represents power, truth, justice, wisdom, independence and peace. Science has also proven that seeing purple can uplift spirits, calm the mind and nerves, and encourage the imagination.

Step 2:
Print and complete the With-You Wrap Submission Form and Card (PDF). The form is for Connecticut NOW to keep track of the number of wraps donated, as well as to let you know where your wrap was sent. The card allows you to send a personal message to the recipient of your wrap.

Step 3:
Mail your wrap along with the completed form and card to:

Cindy Wolfe Boynton

President, Connecticut NOW

26 Burwell Ave., Milford, CT 06460

When we receive your wrap, we’ll tie it in a purple ribbon, attach your card, and deliver it to a CCADV domestic violence shelter or other agency.

Please remember … There is no right or wrong way to knit or crochet a With-You Wrap. Create it with the intention of sending strength and support to the recipient, and you can’t go wrong.

Please email president@now-ct.org with any questions. Click here for a printable PDF of the above directions.

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Bus trip to see Gloria: A Life in NYC with Connecticut NOW!

Spend a day in sisterhood with Connecticut NOW on Saturday, Feb. 9, when we’ll travel together by bus to New York City to see the highly acclaimed “Gloria: A Life” – a play described as “a richly detailed tapestry about one of the most inspiring and remarkable women of our time.” Only 39 seats are available for this special trip, so book now! Cost of $110.00 per person includes a premium ticket to the 2 p.m. performance of the play; an after-performance theater talk-back with a special guest; comfortable, round-trip bus transportation from either Glastonbury or New Haven; and driver gratuity. After the play, we’ll have about 2 hours to eat or otherwise enjoy being in Manhattan before heading home. Timeline for the day:

* 10:30 a.m. pick up travelers leaving from the commuter parking lot at 3024 Main St., Glastonbury

* 11 a.m. pick up travelers leaving from the commuter parking lot facing Long Island Sound at Long Wharf in New Haven

* 2 p.m. see Gloria: A Life, followed by theater talk-back

* 4 p.m.-ish time on your own (with lots of great restaurants in the area)

* 6 p.m. leave NYC for return home

Reserve your space for what it sure to be an inspiring and empowering day!

 

 

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Travel to Washington, D.C. Women’s March with Connecticut NOW

Two of the incredible Connecticut activists who traveled with us to Washington in 2017.

In addition to participating in the Women’s March in Hartford, Connecticut NOW has chartered a bus to take CT NOW members and friends to the 2019 Women’s March in Washington, D.C. Want to be part of the #WomensWave that on Saturday, January 19, 2019 will swell just steps from the U.S. Capitol? Come with us! Our bus will be picking up passengers in Glastonbury and New Haven. Cost per person is $60 for Connecticut NOW members and $75 for non-members. Price includes roundtrip travel in a luxury coach; snacks and drinks to keep you full and hydrated; the excitement and camaraderie that comes from standing up, and speaking out, with like-minded people; bus driver gratuity; and so much more. Space is strictly limited! If you want to attend, please purchase your tickets ASAP. Buying your tickets early will also help us know whether we need to pursue the possibility of chartering a second bus.

Timeline for the trip on January 19, 2019:

* 1:30 a.m. pick up travelers leaving from the commuter parking lot at 3024 Main St., Glastonbury

* 2 a.m. pick up travelers leaving from the commuter parking lot facing Long Island Sound at Long Wharf in New Haven

* 2:15ish a.m. pick up travelers from a Fairfield County commuter parking lot, exact location TBD

* 10 a.m. #WomensWave Women’s March begins

* 6:30 p.m. leave Washington for return home

Click here to reserve your seat. Limited space available.

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Labor Day Is Another Day Of Struggle For Working Women

A statement by national NOW President Toni Van Pelt:

Labor Day is meant to be a day of celebration, marking the contributions made by all working people in the U.S.—but for women, it’s a reminder of how far we remain from full equality.

Women make up 47% of the labor force and are the sole breadwinners in 40% of families with children—and yet, the wage gap between working women and men persists in nearly every occupation.

Despite civil rights laws and advancements in women’s economic status, workplace discrimination still persists. For women of color, this inequity can be devastating. According to the National Women’s Law Center, African American women working full-time are paid 64 cents for every dollar a man earns, and Latina women are paid 56 cents for every dollar a man earns.

Women remain segregated into jobs where they are underpaid and undervalued. Women make up 95% of the workforce in industries considered “women’s work,” such as home care, child care and housekeeping—yet most workers in these fields lack basic employment protections enjoyed by workers in other fields. And women are particularly vulnerable to an artificially low minimum wage that puts their families at risk.

Labor Day won’t be a holiday that’s truly worth celebrating until the gender pay gap is erased, the minimum wage is raised to at least $15, paid parental leave is universal and parents have access to subsidized childcare.

Until then, Labor Day will remain just another day for shopping and barbecue.

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NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR WOMEN, CONNECTICUT CHAPTER, ENDORSES 80+ CANDIDATES RUNNING FOR STATE OFFICES

August 20, 2018–The Connecticut chapter of the National Organization for Women (CT NOW) has endorsed more than 80 candidates running for state office in the November 2018 election.*

The endorsements are based on responses candidates gave to a CT NOW questionnaire. Questions were designed to show how candidates’ beliefs lined up with both Connecticut and national NOW’s legislative and policy priorities. Particular attention was paid to candidates’ answers on questions related to:

  • Reproductive rights and justice
  • Economic justice
  • Ending violence against women
  • Racial justice
  • LBGT rights (including marriage equality)
  • Constitutional equality

All Connecticut candidates were invited to complete the questionnaire. Only those who responded were considered.

“Issues at the core of today’s women’s movement–issues like reproductive rights, gender equality, family leave, access to education and equal pay–aren’t just women’s issues. They’re family issues,” said CT NOW Vice President Kate Hamilton Moser. “They’re also issues that Connecticut officials will likely face in the 2019 Legislative Session, and that are at the core of what NOW is all about. Connecticut NOW is committed to helping elect officials who are equally committed to the advancement of women’s, human rights and equality for all, and we are pleased to offer these endorsements.”

For Statewide Office

  • Governor Ned Lamont, Democrat
  • Lieutenant Governor Susan Bysiewicz, Democrat
  • Attorney General William Tong, Democrat
  • Secretary of State Denise Merrill, Democrat
  • State Treasurer Shawn Wooden, Democrat

For State Senate

  • Beth Bye, Democrat, 5th District
  • Terry Gerratana, Democrat, 6th District
  • Melissa Osborne, Democrat, 8th District
  • Matt Lesser, Democrat, 9th District
  • Gary Winfield, Democrat, 10th District
  • Martin Looney, Democrat, 11th District
  • Christine Cohen, Democrat, 12th District
  • James Maroney, Democrat, 14th District
  • Robert Statchen, Democrat, 18th District
  • Monica Brill, Democrat, 21st District
  • Julie Kushner, Democrat, 24th District
  • Bob Duff, Democrat, 25th District
  • William Haskell, Democrat, 26th District
  • Michelle Lapine McCabe, Democrat, 28th District
  • Chris Wright, Democrat, 31st District
  • Catherine De Carli, Democrat, 32nd District
  • Aili McKeen, Democrat, 34th District
  • John Perrier, Democrat, 35th District

For State House of Representatives

  • Matt Ritter, Democrat, 1st District
  • Raghib Allie-Brennan, Democrat, 2nd District
  • Mary Sanders, Green Party, 4th District
  • Joshua Hall, Democrat, 7th District
  • Brenda Falusi, Democrat, 8th District
  • Geoffrey Luxenberg, Democrat, 12th District
  • Jason Doucette, Democrat, 13th District
  • John Pelkey, Democrat, 14th District
  • Eleni Kavros DeGraw, Democrat, 17th District
  • Jillian Gilchrest, Democrat, 18th District
  • Derek Slap, Democrat, 19th District
  • Michael Demicco, Democrat, 21st District
  • Richard Ireland, Democrat, 22nd District
  • Matt Pugliese, Democrat, 23rd District
  • Gary Turco, Democrat, 27th District
  • Russell Morin, Democrat, 28th District
  • Kerry Wood, Democrat, 29th District
  • Joseph Aresimowicz, Democrat, 30th District
  • Laurel Steinhauser, Democrat, 32nd District
  • Theresa Govert, Democrat, 34th District
  • Jason Adler, Democrat, 35th District
  • Christine Palm, Democrat, 36th District
  • Baird Welch-Collins, Democrat, 38th District
  • Christine Conley, Democrat, 40th District
  • Emmett Riley, Democrat, 46th District
  • Kate Donnelly, Democrat, 47th District
  • Linda Orange, Democrat, 48th District
  • Susan Johnson, Democrat, 49th District
  • Patricia Wilson Pheanious, Democrat, 53rd District
  • Gregory Haddad, Democrat, 54th District
  • Tiffany Thiele, Democrat, 55th District
  • Michael Winkler, Democrat, 56th District
  • Thomas Arnone, Democrat, 5th8 District
  • Jane Garibay, Democrat, 60th District
  • Jack Henrie, Democrat, 61st District
  • Amanda Webster, Democrat, 62nd District
  • Candy Perez, Democrat, 63rd District
  • Maria Horn, Democrat, 64th District
  • Alex Larsson, Democrat, 66th District
  • Greg Cava, Democrat, 69th District
  • David Borzellino, Democrat, 80th District
  • Ryan Rogers, Democrat, 81st District
  • Hilda Santiago, Democrat, 84th District
  • Theresa Ranciato-Viele, 87th District
  • Joshua Elliott, Democrat, 88th District
  • Roland Lemar, Democrat, 96th District
  • James Albis, Democrat, 99th District
  • John-Michael Parker, Democrat, 101st District
  • Robin Comey, Democrat, 102nd District
  • Rebekah Harriman-Stites, Democrat, 106th District
  • Daniel Pearson, Democrat, 107th District
  • Mary Welander, Democrat, 114th District
  • Dorinda Borer, Democrat, 115th District
  • Cindy Wolfe Boynton, Democrat, 117th District
  • Kim Rose, Democrat, 118th District
  • Ellen Beatty, Democrat, 119th District
  • Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox, Democrat, 123rd District
  • Charlie Stallworth, Democrat, 126th District
  • Jack Hennessy, Democrat, 127th District
  • Caitlin Pereira, Democrat, 132nd District
  • Cristin McCarthy Vahey, Democrat, 133rd District
  • Ashley Gaudiano, Democrat, 134th District
  • Anne Hughes, Democrat, 135th District
  • Jonathan Steinberg, Democrat, 136th District
  • Lucy Dathan, Democrat, 142nd District
  • Caroline Simmons, Democrat, 144 District
  • David Michel, Democrat, 146 District
  • Corey Paris, Democrat, 146 District
  • Matthew Blumenthal, Democrat, 147 District
  • Laura Kostin, Democrat, 151 District

Founded in 1970, CT NOW is proud to be part of the largest organization of feminist activists in the United States. The grassroots arm of the women’s movement, we are one of more than 500 local and campus national NOW affiliates across the United States and a leader–rather than a follower–of public opinion. Learn more about us at www.now-ct.org.

*Updated October 1, 2018

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