On the Importance of Teen Activism

It is of utmost importance that we, the youth of America, become promoters of change and take action. We are the future, and the time to create a better tomorrow is now.

A call to action by an organizer of the March For Our Lives Rally in Shelton

By Julia Meyer

Shelton High students Tyler Massias, Angela Camara and the author of this blog post, Julia Meyer.

My name is Julia Meyer, and I am an organizer of Shelton March For Our Lives and a teen activist. I believe we are currently living in one of the most crucial political times in American history. There is a heavy demand now, more than ever, for United States citizens to challenge the system that has failed them for so long. With the current presidential administration, it will be an uphill battle to change the flaws in our country. This provides young people–specifically teenagers and young women–an opportunity to share their voices in the hopes of making today’s problems nonexistent tomorrow.

It is especially important for teens to share their voices because we are the future. Many of us young adults will be eligible to register to vote very soon. Therefore, we should start pinpointing the issues that matter to us now. For those who do not know where to start, try making a list of things that matter to you. Then think, What can be done to make sure these things are prioritized?

Take women’s rights for example, many of us young women want to have equal opportunities to our male counterparts. Maybe you feel more can be done to allow for women to have equal pay in the workplace. If so, do something about it! Reach out to your local representatives, congressmen, and town officials. Participate in demonstrations or protests to advocate for these issues that matter. You want to make what you care about a priority amongst people in power, so you can get the change you want.

As a result of the recent Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, many teen activists have risen up to promote change. Since the tragedy, the school’s students have been figureheads for the fight for gun control. Emma González, for example, was a survivor of the shooting and has been an advocate for change. She initially grabbed the nation’s attention after delivering a speech at a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., gun control rally. The speech went viral. She has since been advocating for gun control through social media and even appeared on The Ellen Show, alongside fellow student activists Cameron Kasky and Jaclyn Corin. After the tragedy, Emma has become an example for young women everywhere. She is living proof that by speaking up, you will be heard. Emma has shown that any young person, especially a women, can be an advocate for change.

This Saturday, March 24, students, teachers, parents and thousands of others will march on the streets of Washington, D.C., to demand an end to gun violence and safety in our schools. This event will be known as the “March For Our Lives.” On this same day, hundreds of sister marches around the country will be also taking place, including one in Hartford and one in Shelton.

The Shelton March For Our Lives rally will take place at 12:30 p.m. Saturday at Veterans Memorial Park, 38 Canal St. E. It is being organized by myself, Tyler Massias and Angela Camara. At this event, students, teachers, parents, and local officials will speak about gun violence and school safety. We will then march the streets of Shelton, passing by City Hall and demanding change. All our welcome to join us.

The March For Our Lives rallies provide a great outlet for teens to share their voices, whether it be by speaking at them or by marching. It is especially important for young people like me to promote the causes of school safety and ending gun violence, because these issues directly affect us.

It is important that teenagers’ voices be heard as loudly as everyone else’s. The current conflicts of our country affect every citizen, young and old. It is of utmost importance that we, the youth of America, become promoters of change and take action. We are the future, and the time to create a better tomorrow is now.

Julia Meyer is a junior at Shelton High School.

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